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Key Topics in Restorative Dentistry

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Endodontics

Root end surgery UR1 and cyst removal by John Rhodes

An informative video with some brilliant footage of the management of a upper right central incisor. https://youtu.be/EaMxV8kNCWo

Continued apexogenesis of immature permanent incisors following trauma by Welbury & Walton

Two cases of trauma to immature teeth are described which differed significantly in their initial severity. However, both subsequently presented with continued apical root formation. In the two cases a histological examination after tooth removal confirmed continued apical development ot... Continue Reading →

Endodontics and the ageing patient

Patients are living longer and the rate of edentulism is decreasing. Endodontic treatment is an essential part of maintain-ing the health and well-being of the elderly. Retention of natural teeth improves the quality of life and the overall healthand longevity... Continue Reading →

A practical guide to endodontic access cavity preparation in molar teeth by Patel & Rhodes

The main objective of access cavity preparation is to identify the root canal entrances for subsequent preparation and obturation of the root canal system. Access cavity preparation can be one of the most challenging and frustrating aspects of endodontic treatment,... Continue Reading →

Guidelines for management of sodium hypochlorite extrusion injuries by Farook et al. 2014

Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) is the most common irrigant used in modern endodontics. It is highly effective at dissolv- ing organic debris and disinfecting the root canal system due to the high pH. Extravasation of NaOCl into intra-oral and extra-oral tissues... Continue Reading →

Lets talk about Tooth Restorability…a collection of sources on an expansive subject

Restorability is a fairly nebulous term that many may consider subjective and individual to the clinician, the tooth and the patients perception of what they would accept as an outcome. I liken attempts at rationalising the process of the assessment... Continue Reading →

Post-and-cores: Past to present by Terry & Swift

For more than 250 years, clinicians have written about the placement of posts in the roots of teeth to retain restorations. As early as 1728, Pierre Fauchard described the use of “tenons,” which were metal posts screwed into the roots... Continue Reading →

Restoration of the root canal treated tooth by Eliyas et al.

When considering endodontically treated teeth, the quality of the restoration is important from the outset. It sheds light into possible causes of pulp necrosis or failure of endodontic treatment and influences the outcome of future endodontic treatment. A tooth undergoing... Continue Reading →

Beautiful documentation by John Rhodes of microsurgical endodontics

www.rootcanals.co.uk

The Ferrule Effect-A short video

    Click here for Key Topics in Restorative Dentistry Symposium on Occlusion

Micro-surgical endodontics by Eliyas et al.

Non-surgical endodontic retreatment is the treatment of choice for endodontically treated teeth with recurrent or residual disease in the majority of cases. In some cases, surgical endodontic treatment is indicated. Successful micro-surgical endodontic treatment depends on the accuracy of diagnosis,... Continue Reading →

Cracked molar management

Case by John Rhodes www.rootcanals.co.uk Click here for Key Topics in Restorative Dentistry Symposium on Occlusion

Root Canal Treatment 100 years ago

How much has really changed in 100 years in clinical practice? This video shows root canal treatment from 1917...as you can see rubber dam was used, as was sodium hypochlorite, Gutta Percha and the recognition that the canal system needed... Continue Reading →

Assessing restored teeth with pulp and periapical diseases for the presence of cracks, caries and marginal breakdown by Abbott 2004

BACKGROUND: To determine whether clinical examinations and periapical radiographs provide sufficient information to assess the cause of pulp and periapical diseases, the status of teeth when restored and their further treatment needs. Other aims were to determine whether restorations should be... Continue Reading →

Sodium Hypochlorite accident and complications

Aqueous sodium hypochlorite (bleach) solution is widely used in dental practice during root canal treatment. Although it is generally regarded as being very safe, potentially severe complications can occur when it comes into contact with soft tissue. This paper discusses the... Continue Reading →

Endodontic management of a horizontally root fractured central incisor

Case by John Rhodes www.rootcanals.co.uk  

Cracked tooth syndrome. Part 1: aetiology and diagnosis by Banerji et al. 2010

Symptomatic, incompletely fractured posterior teeth can be a great source of anxiety for both the dental patient and den- tal operator. For the latter, challenges associated with deriving an accurate diagnosis together with the ef cient and time effective management... Continue Reading →

Why keep the canal patent ? An article by Khatavkar & Hegde

One of the major controversies in root canal concerns the apical limit of instrumentation and obturation. A number of anatomical histological studies have been carried out to determine the true termination of the root canal. The apical extent of the... Continue Reading →

Dens Invaginatus is a problem from the outside in. A review by Alani & Bishop 2008

This review considers the different possible nomenclatures and concludes that dens invaginatus is the most appropriate description. The paper highlights the different reported prevalence figures and concludes that the problem is probably one of the most common of the dental... Continue Reading →

The Endocrown: A Different Type of All-Ceramic Reconstruction for Molars by Fages and Bennasar

The endocrown is indicated for the endodontic restoration of severely damaged molars. This monolithic, ceramic adhesive restoration requires specific preparation techniques to satisfy criteria that are primarily biomechanical in nature: a cervical margin in the form of a butt joint... Continue Reading →

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